Simple Slider (Carousel With Pure CSS)

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A carousel is a good instance of a attainable CSS-only interactive function. Whereas carousels (aka sliders) are often constructed with JavaScript, if we take away the advanced options, they’re merely scrollable parts with an overflow; precisely what CSS is made for.

You is likely to be pondering “CSS is used for styling whereas JavaScript is used for interactivity, that’s simply the best way the net works.”

Nonetheless, contemplating the truth that CSS is loaded on a webpage sooner than JavaScript, and CSS additionally causes much less reflow on a web page (which improves efficiency), it’s honest to say we must always use CSS for interactivity wherever attainable.

1. Format With HTML

The format of our straightforward slider is easy: we’ll create a carousel-container div to carry the carousel-slide parts. 

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<div class="carousel-container">
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  <div class="carousel-slide">1</div>
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  ...
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</div>

That’s all we’d like so let’s transfer on to the styling

As soon as we’ve our carousel slides arrange, we’ll type the carousel to have the next options:

  1. Scrollable content material
  2. Snap to subsequent slide
  3. Progress bar indicating slide progress

Scrollable Content material

For the scrollable content material, we’ll use the show:flex and overflow-x: auto properties. We’ll additionally type slides so we will see 3 slides on the desktop display screen and 1 slide on cell.

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.carousel-container {
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  show: flex;
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  overflow-x: auto;
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}
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.carousel-slide {
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  flex: 1 0 30%;
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}
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@media (max-width: 600px) {
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  .carousel-slide {
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    flex: 1 0 90%;
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  }
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}

Snap to Slide

Subsequent, to attain the snapping impact on the slides, we’ll use the CSS scroll-snap properties. The scroll snap properties enable us outline “snapping” factors on a component (the purpose of the factor that we wish to be absolutely seen as soon as scrolling). Our up to date code appears to be like like this:

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.carousel-container {
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  show: flex;
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  overflow-x: auto;
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  scroll-snap-type: x obligatory;
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}
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.carousel-slide {
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  flex: 1 0 30%;
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  scroll-snap-align: middle;
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}
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@media (max-width: 600px) {
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  .carousel-slide {
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    flex: 1 0 90%;
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  }
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}

Elective: CSS-Solely Progress Bar

To maintain inline with our CSS-only interactivity, we will benefit from native browser options to create a progress bar for our carousel. We’ll do that by styling the carousel container scrollbar to present the looks of a progress bar. That is what the code appears to be like like:

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.carousel-container::-webkit-scrollbar {
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  top: 8px;
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}
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.carousel-container::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb {
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  background: #29AB87;
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}
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.carousel-container::-webkit-scrollbar-track {
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  background: #b1b3b399;
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}
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.carousel-container::-webkit-scrollbar-track-piece:begin {
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  background: #29AB87;
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}

Let’s have a look at the properties we’re utilizing:

  • ::webkit-scrollbar: your complete scrollbar factor 
  • ::webkit-scrollbar-thumb: the draggable bar on the scrollbar
  • ::webkit-scrollbar-track: the trail that the scrollbar thumb is on
  • ::webkit-scrollbar-track-piece:begin: the trail of the monitor not coated by the scrollbar thumb, the :begin selector targets solely the trail behind the scrollbar thumb

Within the diagram above, we will see what elements of the scrollbar are being focused. By making the -webkit-scrollbar-thumb and ::webkit-scrollbar-track-piece:begin the identical color, the scrollbar gives the look of being stuffed in because it’s being scrolled, thus making a progress bar.

And since our progress bar is definitely a scrollbar, it can be used to scroll by the carousel as a further function: it’s a win/win!

The ::webkit-scrollbar properties are non-standard, fairly sketchy, and never supported by all browsers so it’s not advisable to make use of this in a manufacturing setting. This implies our progress bar will appear to be an everyday scrollbar on non-supported browsers, or in case you select to not embrace these ::webkit-scrollbar guidelines.

That’s all there’s to our straightforward slider! We have constructed a scrollable container with a nifty snapping function and even added a progress bar utilizing solely CSS:

3. Extra Options With JavaScript

Since we’ve gotten the fundamental function of the carousel out of the best way, we will go on so as to add much more options, utilizing JavaScript this time.

A type of options is utilizing arrows to deal with the carousel navigation. In a earlier tutorial, we regarded into constructing a carousel with JavaScript (lower than 14 strains of code!), so we will mix that tutorial with this one so as to add much more options to our straightforward slider.

That is what our mixed carousel appears to be like like:

Only for enjoyable, on this demo the code has been refactored to make use of even fewer strains of JavaScript, so that is what our up to date carousel arrow operate appears to be like like:

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const carousel = doc.querySelector(".carousel-container");
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const slide = doc.querySelector(".carousel-slide");
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operate handleCarouselMove(optimistic = true) {
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  const slideWidth = slide.clientWidth;
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  carousel.scrollLeft = optimistic ? carousel.scrollLeft + slideWidth : carousel.scrollLeft - slideWidth;
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}

Then we move that operate to our HTML arrows:

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<button class="carousel-arrow carousel-arrow--prev" onclick="handleCarouselMove(false)">
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  &#8249;
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</button>
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<button class="carousel-arrow carousel-arrow--next" onclick="handleCarouselMove()">
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  &#8250;
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</button>

And with that, we’ll name it a day on our modded-up carousel!

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